Sunday, October 4, 2009

It's the infamous Canadian drop scones and Anne Shirley what done it, your 'onour!

Had a hard rubbish collection around here recently (she types gingerly while balancing a sickly cat on her lap) and yesterday the Sunday Trash and Treasure Market was fuller than usual.
Coincidence? I think not.
I could swear I saw that wicker-work telephone table (a mere snip at $35 !) 2 streets over just last week on my evening walk, the exercise bike (with uber-fluffy brand new sheepskin seat cover) was, I'm sure, last seen decorating the nature strip down a side street and the tread-mill ("It's a bit stiff but once you get it going it works ok") was buried under a pile of empty paint tins at the end of the street near FB's old school.
But I'm not begrudging the scavengers because -
A) They pay for their stall at the market which is run by a charity that fund-raises for those less fortunate and
B) What doesn't get sold quickly finds its way into the charity bins conveniently located beside the car park exit.
Besides which, nothing was recycled in this years' hard rubbish drive - everything was compacted in the back of a truck, t'weren't nothing getting into any tip shop, no siree bob!

1836  J W Hooson rocked up in Port Phillip in his size 8 police-issue Doc Martins (he aspired to size 10 but he was an underfed as a tadpole, subsisting on treacle and jam) to swagger about as the first copper to foxtrot the beat in Victoria.

1866 A rather grisly entry in the annals of history happened when the Maungatapu murderers were hanged by their necks until they were dead in Nelson.

1871 The Prince Edward Island Railway was well on its way to becoming real, and trundling Anne Shirley to Matthew and Marilla, when the first spadeful of dirt was dug.

1899 Lyttelton Harbour has seen the arrival and departure of many especially those who sailed off to war; on this day it bore witness to the first contingent going off to the Boer War.

1899 Ed-ya-ma-kay-shun was made free but compulsory in Westralia.
Until they began asking for those "voluntary" fees.
And "donations" for supplies.

1973 Canada sold more than 200 million bushels of wheat to China, over a three year period, for those scrumptious drop scones, of course!

4 comments:

Marita said...

'1899 Ed-ya-ma-kay-shun was made free but compulsory in Westralia.
Until they began asking for those "voluntary" fees.
And "donations" for supplies.'


I read that as Wrestlemania and got very confused. Why would hot hunky wrestlers need compulsory education. :D

River said...

If you "dropped" one of my mum's "scones" you could use it for a hockey puck. She never could get the hang of making scones.

Mistress B said...

our local council won't do a hard rubbish collection at all. ever.

hot hunky wrestlers need an Ed-ya-ma-kay-shun so they can reply to their fan mail with requests for more frilly knickers!

Cazzie!!! said...

The council here has ceased his operation now and so it will be back to the tip for some residents I guess. Me, if I want something taken away I will post it on Freecycle in my area or just call Diabetes Australia to come collect it. Cannot be bothered with Ebay anymore really.

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